Dal Sabzi for the Aatman Dal Sabzi for the Aatman Dal Sabzi for the Aatman Dal Sabzi for the Aatman Dal Sabzi for the Aatman  
  ‼  Aum, Asato maa sadgamaya, Tamaso maa jyotirgamaya  ‼  
     

 

Buddha

Dear Children,

Today I am going to tell you about a Prince whose name was Siddhartha.

He lived in the country of Nepal, in the North of India.  For the first part of his young life, he led a life full of joy and luxury. No shade of unhappiness crossed his path.

Then young Siddhartha saw a very old man. He was surprised to know, that one day, if he lived long enough, he would become old. As the prince was coming to terms with that fact, he saw a very ill man. He asked, those with him, if there was a possibility that he could fall ill one day. And he was told, that the body goes out of order sometimes. 

Then young Siddhartha saw a man who had just died. All the above experiences made young Siddhartha realize, that even though life was joyful, there was a lot of unhappiness in the world. 

At that time, Siddhartha was married to a beautiful young girl, whose name was Yashodara, and had a young son called Rahul. The prince started to think deeply about why man suffered. In order to be able to devote more time to his quest, Siddhartha left his kingdom, wife and child and went into the forest. The prince went through a lot of hardships. Can you imagine a prince who had been born on the midst of luxury, neither having anything to eat, nor a bed to sleep on?

Then young Siddhartha realized that too much of hardship, makes it hard to concentrate, think and meditate! Too much of comfort was also not the answer, as then, there are too many distractions. So, young Siddhaartha figured out, that the best way to learn, was through the middle way.

Not too much of luxury, not too much hardships Not too much food, not too little food Not too much work, not too little work Not studying all the time, not playing all the time. Dear children, don't you think that is the best way to become successful?

Siddhartha, while following the middle path, continued to look for the meaning of life, and the way to be 'beyond suffering'. One day, sitting under a tree, he suddenly discovered, what he had been looking for all his life.

Siddhartha from now on, would become known as 'Gautama Buddha', the Enlightened One.

Buddha returned home and taught his family what he had learned. But he did not stay home. He had a big responsibility. That responsibility was to teach the world. Buddha wandered in India, for the next 40 years, teaching.

What he taught, I shall tell you, next time, ok?

With love Dadi Ma Nani-Ma

 

BUDDHA-THE EIGHT-FOLD PATH

Dear Children,

Last time, I told you about Siddhartha, who became the Buddha. Today I shall tell you about what he taught. I am not going to tell you a story today. But I shall introduce you to what the Great Buddha taught. Do you remember how Buddha went through so many difficulties? Well, he suffered so much in order to teach us the following rules. I shall try to explain them to you in an easy way. Every time, you are unhappy, look up the following rules, and you will realize what you have done wrong. You will then realize why you are unhappy, and what you can do to correct it. If you follow these rules, you will learn to be happy with yourself.

The rules are a little difficult, but you are bright children, so I know that you will be able to understand, what I am about to tell you. Last time I told you how young Siddhaartha figured out, that the best way to learn how to live, was through the middle way.

Not too much of luxury, not too much hardships
Not too much food, not too little food
Not too much work, not too little work
Not studying all the time, not playing all the time.
Buddha taught his followers 'The eight-fold Path'.

1)Right Beliefs.
What do you believe in? Is it right? Or are you carried away by what your wayward friend advises? I would say: Besides other good things you may believe, Believe in God, but most of all, believe in yourself. You are God's creation. As such you are capable, good, kind and lovable. Believe it!

2) Right Aims.
What is it that you hope to achieve? Maybe some of you would like to be doctors or scientists or pilots… The list is endless. I would say be what you want to be, but add the quality of good and fair and compassionate and loving…

3) Right Speech.
Speak truthfully, clearly, sweetly, lovingly. You will be able to get your point across, better, when you are calm, rather than when you are agitated.

4) Right Conduct.
I would say, take help from your elders, Listen to those who are wiser than you, and have more experience than you do. Think in your mind, and pray for help as to how you should act. I believe that your prayers will be answered.

5) Right Occupation.
According to me, 'right occupation' is, how you spend your time. It could also mean, the right way to earn a living. There is the right time, to do the right thing; and also, the right thing to do at the right time! Is that difficult to understand? Think a little about it and you will. Understand, I mean.

6) Right Effort.
The above, according to me, is very important. Have you heard the saying: 'God helps those, who help themselves?' Well, you can only leave the results to God, after you have put in your best efforts, right?

7) Right Thinking.
To think right is very important, dear children. And do you know how to think right? You think right by listening to your elders and teachers. Also by reading good books and practicing what you learn. 

8) Right Concentration.
You know that when you are distracted and do not pay attention, you cannot learn anything. So you must learn to concentrate on the task at hand. Concentration can also mean meditation.

In 'Living Buddha Living Christ' Thich Nhat Hanh writes:

...In Buddhist monasteries, we eat our meals in silence to make it easier to give our full attention to the food and to the other members of the community who are present. And we chew each morsel of food thoroughly, at least thirty times, to help us be truly in touch with it. Eating this way is very good for digestion.

Before every meal, a monk or a nun recites the Five Contemplations: 

This food is the gift of the whole universe-the earth, the sky, and much hard work.

May we live in a way that is worthy of this food

May we transform our unskillful states of mind, especially that of greed.

May we eat only foods that nourish us and prevent illness.

May we accept this food for the realization of the way of understanding and love."

 

Dear children, I repeat that I know, that I have not told you a story today. I again tell you that, I have introduced you to what the Great Buddha taught. I state again, Do you remember how Buddha went through so many difficulties? Well, he suffered so much in order to teach us the above rules. I have tried to explain them to you in an easy way. Every time, you are unhappy, look up the above rules, and you will realize what you have done wrong. You will then realize why you are unhappy, and what you can do to correct it. If you follow these rules, you will learn to be happy with yourself. 

Read Message of Masters: Lord Buddha

 
Google Site Search
Google
Search the Web
Search DalSabzi.com
 
ADS BY GOOGLE

 


 
   
 
 

Dal Sabzi for the Aatman™ is the sole property of Smt. Shakun Narain.
This website is best viewed with MS Internet Explorer 6 or above under 1024x786 resolution.